Mick Wallace @fafner84 Thanks for your kind words...
Mick Wallace RT @redfishstream: "Italia got more solidarity from China and Cuba than it got from Europe." Irish Member of the European Parliament Mick…
Mick Wallace How in God's name can joining #NATO be in interest of people of North Macedonia? - More unnecessary spend on Milit… https://t.co/lC29IWtLbJ
Mick Wallace The #US could only treat #Cuba as it does with the complicity of the #EuropeanUnion - which cuts a sad figures as… https://t.co/js5TJIEJH8
Mick WallaceAfter a few weeks in the Dáil Chamber, you’d think I’d be settling in at this stage. I’m not so sure. Maybe it should be important not to ever get too settled in a structure that is in much need of change. Despite all warnings to the contrary, I have had the privilege of speaking in the chamber every day since it opened – being part of the Technical Group of Independents has certainly worked out well with regard to gaining speaking rights. Many times during the election I was told that, as an Independent, I would find it difficult to get opportunities to express my point of view in the chamber. Obviously, influencing the decision-making process is another challenge but, for the moment, I am prepared to give the coalition the benefit of the doubt when they say that they will certainly engage with us Independents. Following my opening speech, I addressed the issue of Constitutional change and the manner in which the coalition might deal with it. In the Labour election manifesto, prior to February 25th, it was made clear that they would include ordinary people and civil society groups in the Constitutional Convention, but when it came to the coalition’s Programme for Government, the Labour promise was very much watered down with the terms ‘ordinary citizens’ and ‘civil society organisations’ disappearing. If the government  are serious about Constitutional change, it is imperative that they behave in a democratic manner, which means involving the people, and preventing the process staying too much ‘in house’. We’ve had many reports on Constitutional change before, but they amounted to very little as they remained an exercise internal to the existing system. My third speech related to the government’s backing for the Western powers bombing of Libya. Sadly, the lessons of Iraq and Afghanistan have still to be learnt by many in public office. I refuse to accept that dropping bombs on people from the sky is a good way of introducing them to democracy. The US and its allies have been very selective about where to introduce no-fly zones or begin a bombing campaign. Sarkozy refused to support the people’s revolt in Tunisia and Egypt but couldn’t wait to bomb Libya – not because he actually cares about civilians in Libya but more likely because he sees it as a way of improving his chances of re-election in France next year. Why didn’t these civic-minded leaders think of introducing a no-fly zone over Palestine in 2009 when Israel was bombing the ‘living daylights’ out of it? Or Bahrain and Yemen in the last few weeks where civilians were being shot on the streets by American-backed dictators? On the following two days, I managed to speak on the risk of nuclear energy as so clearly demonstrated by the crisis in Japan recently, also spoke on the lack of honesty in much of Ireland’s approach to world political affairs, before eventually getting around to the latest scandal in Irish education with the reduction of learning support teachers through the removal of Resource Teachers for Travellers and the Visiting Teacher Service for Travellers, as well as the cap imposed on the number of Special Needs Assistants. I visited a national school in Clonroche to try to understand the extent to which a school can be decimated by savage cuts of this nature. The school’s learning support system is being reduced from two and a half teachers (one teacher is shared with another school) to one – placing a massive burden on the staff of a school that is clearly very well run, and run in the spirit of vocation to the children rather than just a job. I challenged the Minister of Education, Ruairi Quinn, to consider the madness of this measure –  research has shown that for every euro spent on children, the State saves €7 before that same child becomes an adult. Even if you didn’t have a social bone in your body, from an economic point of view, investing in children makes for good business. In between the Dáil business, I had a good meeting with Miles Deas and James Nix in relation to the Wexford bypass in particular and Transport policy in Ireland in general. Miles and James have carried out some serious research on the issue and it is certainly deserving of our attention. They’ve looked at the manner in which the projected traffic volume figures for the Wexford area have been measured. They argue that the numbers have been exagerrated and this undermines the need for a Wexford bypass, aside from the fact that the State surely has better things to be doing with its money in these times. They also stress the need for reform in the way funding decisions are made regarding which transport projects to prioritise, and also the importance of amending cost-benefit appraisals for transport projects. I intend to address these issues in the Dáil at the first opportunity. I managed to make it down to Enniscorthy for the meeting on rates where almost 500 business people of Wexford turned up to express their grievances. Being a rate payer myself in a climate where rates bear no relation to the economic situation that we are all struggling to survive in, I can certainly understand their plight. It is a pressing issue that our new government needs to take a sensible approach towards – and quickly, before more and more small and medium size businesses go to the wall. Lastly, I was able to squeeze in a meeting on Sunday afternoon after football training with a group of people from the different parts of the county who are interested in helping me to link with the people of Wexford. As I’ve said from the start, I intend to deal with issues that concern the community at large rather than individual cases. We need to address the root causes of the problems that prevail in our society, and work towards improving the quality of services provided for all. Rome was not built in a day, but it was started...

Mick Wallace

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namaleaks

THE TRUTH IS COMING....

Namaleaks is a project that seeks to uncover possible injustice and poor practice related to NAMA (National Asset Management Agency) and financial institutions in Ireland.

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