Mick Wallace RT @wallacemick: The lack of concern shown by the #EU for the people of #Venezuela has been shocking and says much about their so called 'E…
Mick Wallace RT @wallacemick: #EU says they're interested in Dialogue - So why don't they talk to #Syria ..? They say they're interested in Rule of Law…
Mick Wallace An Atalanta win over Real Madrid would be seriously good for football... https://t.co/hUfOdNomaO
Mick Wallace Banning accounts for 'Undermining Confidence in #NATO' ..? Given that NATO is an entity that is designed to promote… https://t.co/sgeQPU3LcG

Dail Diary

 

Dáil Diary no 2- 16 Jan. 15

Mass Surveillance by GCHQ – Minister contacts British Embassy…

Edward Snowden has revealed that British Intelligence body GCHQ have tapped communication cables in the Irish Sea which amounts to mass surveillance. I asked the Minister for Justice if the Irish Government authorized it, if they did, under what legislations was it done, and if not, what are they going to do about it? The Minister denied authorising it and said that the Minister for Foreign Affairs has been in contact with the British Embassy regarding the matter – something in which the Irish mainstream media has shown absolutely no interest. Here’s yesterday’s Dáil exchange on the issue -

 “I have raised this issue twice on Leaders' Questions but got no answers. I heard back from the Taoiseach this morning but there were still no answers. What I want to know relates to the information leaked by Edward Snowden that communications cables between Ireland and the UK have been tapped. The Taoiseach said in the House that any tapping or interception of these communications would likely have occurred within the jurisdiction of the UK and would presumably be covered by EU law. There is no EU law to cover mass surveillance. Will the Minister answer the three questions I have asked on the issue?

Deputy Frances Fitzgerald:  I am aware of the media reports alleging that GCHQ in the UK has tapped undersea communications cables. The media reports also suggest that this may have been linked to surveillance being carried out within the UK's own jurisdiction. My colleague, the Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade, has already been in contact with the British Embassy on this issue. It has been conveyed that it is generally understood that friendly relationships between states include acceptance of the principle that the privacy of communications must be respected. I agree with the Deputy that protection of data and the privacy of communication are not matters that should be taken lightly, and it is right that communications are safeguarded and protected against unlawful intrusion and interception.

The lawful interception of communications is sometimes a necessary tool for law enforcement authorities in order to protect citizens against terrorism and other serious criminal threats, as I am sure the Deputy will agree. The majority of citizens would accept that there should be a balance between personal privacy and public safety once the mechanisms by which such data is accessed are both legal and proportionate. There is no question of mass surveillance. If we needed reminding of the threat posed by international terrorism then we need only look to the horrific events in Paris last week. Criminals and terrorists have not been slow to take advantage of the various technological advances in communications in recent years. It is essential that our law enforcement and intelligence agencies have the necessary resources to address this dimension of the threat.

The interception of an individual's communications in this State can only occur in the very specific circumstances laid down in the Interception of Postal Packets and Telecommunications Messages (Regulation) Act 1993. This Act permits me to authorise an interception but only for the purposes of criminal investigation into serious offences or in the interests of the security of the State. The operation of the Act is overseen by a designated judge of the High Court who reports annually to the Taoiseach on his or her examination of its operation. In addition, a complaints referee, who is normally a serving judge of the Circuit Court, is appointed to receive and investigate complaints from persons who believe that their communications have been unlawfully intercepted. It should be clear from the above that there is no question of me as Minister having authorised or having the authority to authorise the kind of activity alluded to in the Deputy's question. As far as the UK is concerned, the Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade has taken up that issue with the British authorities.

Mick Wallace:  It would be good if we got some feedback if the Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade is talking to the British authorities about the fact that this is unlawful and that it is not good enough. If GCHQ is allowed to work in this area without getting approval from Ireland, it is very worrying. It would be interesting to see what the British might have to say about it, but that information should be relayed to the public. There is huge public concern about the fact that many communications seem to be under surveillance. The legislation signed by the Minister for Justice and Equality on 26 November 2014 has caused much worry for people in Ireland. Digital Rights Ireland won a case in Europe last year against the existing legislation. The case showed that the storage of much of this information on people was illegal and in breach of their privacy rights.

An Ceann Comhairle: I will let the Deputy back in.

Mick Wallace:  Would the Minister agree that under the powers she now has, she can force telecommunications companies to give her data that infringes people's privacy rights?

Deputy Frances Fitzgerald:  There is no question of the Irish Government agreeing to the situation outlined by the Deputy. The UK legislation is for the UK to decide. I have made it very clear that we have a very serious approach to any interception of telecommunications in this country. We have very clear laws about it. It is only used where there is a question of criminal activity or where the security of the State is considered to be at risk. There is a very serious approach to it overseen by a High Court judge and a Circuit Court judge.

Most citizens would agree that there needs to be a balance between the privacy rights of individuals and the protection of the interests and security of the State and dealing with criminal activity. They would understand that some action would have to be taken on very specific occasions and with a very specific approach under regulation to deal with that and to allow for that interception. I am aware of the ECJ case and we will examine the outcome of it. Even in that case, the ECJ made it very clear that in terms of criminal activity, the interception of communications was a legitimate action for a State to take.

Mick Wallace:  I again refer the Minister to the concerns of the chairman of Digital Rights Ireland, Dr. T. J. McIntyre, who is a lecturer in UCD. He says: "It's worrying because it means telecommunications companies might be pressured into doing things that aren't entirely legal." He said that the companies would be prosecuted in secret and would be unable to disclose their objections publicly or even the fact that they were being prosecuted. He said he was very reluctant to allow that it was a good idea for the Minister to have the power to force companies to comply with secret orders.

The Minister is saying that the people are concerned about terrorist activities. Yes, they are concerned, but the balance appears to be going very much the other way. The principle of State security is being abused in order to impinge on the rights of ordinary people. Mass surveillance is becoming more common, there is far more interruption of communications and the private citizen is very concerned about it. We are heading down the wrong path on this.

Deputy Frances Fitzgerald:  I do not accept the premise of quite a number of points made by the Deputy. For a start, I absolutely believe that most right-thinking citizens would welcome the State's taking action to protect its citizens. Certainly, that is very much on people's minds following the Paris attacks in particular. My belief is that citizens want to be protected.

I have already told the Deputy that there is no question of mass surveillance. Neither do I accept the premise that companies involved in the communications industry will break the law. They will follow the law that is there.

Mick Wallace:  Vodafone did.

Deputy Frances Fitzgerald: I believe they will follow the law that is there and my experience suggests that is the situation. We want strong law that protects the rights of citizens but when appropriate and in the interests of dealing with criminality, particularly international criminal activity which we know is increasingly carried out via the Internet, it is important that our laws are strong enough to deal with it.

Mick Wallace.

Good health is a result of proper nutrition and hygiene. How can medicaments hels up? Circumstances that can influence your choice when you are buying medications are various. Below are basic reasons about cialis vs levitra vs viagra which one is better. Surely there are also other momentous questions. Choosing the unimprovable treatment variation for a racy disease can get really confusing considering the advantages and disadvantages of the existing treatment methodologies. When you buy remedies like Cialis you have to mind about levitra vs cialis vs viagra. The most significant thing you must look for is which works better viagra or cialis or levitra. A long list of prescription drugs can lead to erectile dysfunction, including many blood pressure medicines, pain remedies, and most of antidepressants. Sometimes the treatment options may turn on erectile dysfunction remedies or hormone treatments.

Dáil Diary no 1. 12 January 2015

Who Dares Speak to US/Israeli Power…

Last week, an interesting article appeared in the ‘Jerusalem Post’ newspaper, where Israeli Foreign Minister Avigdor Liberman was critical of comments I made in the Dáil Chamber in late December re the Israeli/Palestine conflict. Recent events in the region reinforce the belief of many that neither the Israeli leadership or the US have any real interest in a genuine two state solution. The Irish Government pays lip service to the idea, but there unswerving support for the US/ Israeli position tells a different story. The relentless expansion of Israeli settlements on Palestinian land provokes just soft words from the likes of the US and Europe, including Ireland. The latest onslaught on Gaza last summer when over 500 children were killed, may not have generated the merited shock/horror from many mainstream media outlets and NGO's, due to the power of America and Israel, but world opinion is changing. Israeli Foreign Minister Liberman can express regret at my comments re the history of the conflict, taken from Noam Chomsky, but the Israeli's have rarely of late been very interested in any opinion but their own. Right now, Israel is losing the struggle for legitimacy and that's developing into a fundamental problem for them. UN diplomacy has failed because the US can decide what's a legitimate or illegitimate move by the Palestinians to gain freedom, Independence and to end apartheid. We now need a different kind of diplomacy, that starts with International law. Here’s the ‘Jerusalem Post’ article -
 
“The number one challenge facing Israel in 2015 is not the Palestinians, Iran or Hezbollah, but rather western Europe, Foreign Minister Avigdor Liberman said Sunday.

Liberman, speaking at the Foreign Ministry to a gathering of Israel’s ambassadors in Europe, said Europe’s record in various international forums underscores the dilemma.

For instance, at last week’s UN Security Council vote on the Palestinian resolution calling for a full Israeli withdrawal to the pre-1967 lines in three years, France and Luxembourg voted for the proposal, while Britain and Lithuania abstained, and the US and Australia voted against.

Liberman said attention needed to be paid to the fact that the voting patterns of European countries shows there is more sensitivity and understanding to the challenges Israel faces in central and eastern Europe than there is on other parts of the continent.

He characterized Germany, with which Israel will mark 50 years of diplomatic ties this year, as the “principal anchor” of Israel’s ties with Europe.

By contrast, Liberman said the behavior of countries like Sweden and Ireland toward Israel is reminiscent of Europe’s attitude toward Czechoslovakia on the eve of the appeasement of the Nazis in Munich in 1938.

“The behavior of countries like Sweden and Ireland is the same behavior and abandonment that existed in Europe in 1938 with the Munich Agreement, when the Europeans abandoned their biggest ally, Czechoslovakia,” he said.

Like the situation in 1938, so too today, Liberman said, the polices of countries like Sweden and Ireland are ones of the abandonment of Israel, along with explanations as to why it is possible to do so.

This is happening, he said, even though Israel “is the only country that represents western values in the Middle East.”

Liberman has said he will not meet the foreign minister of Sweden when she visits the country this month because of that country’s recognition of “Palestine” and the duplicitous way in which he feels it was done.

Some of the discussions in the European Parliaments that have taken up the question of whether to recognize “Palestine,” he said, included lies and fabrications that amounted to “another chapter in the Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Sometimes you are shocked at how people who are supposed to be respected and serious make things up and brazenly lie during simple discussions where you expect some depth and knowledge of the things they talk about.”

Liberman directed the Foreign Ministry to circulate some of the extreme anti-Israel comments of European parliamentarians during debates on the recognition of “Palestine” last year.

For instance, Mick Wallace – an independent Irish parliamentarian – made the following comments during debates there on recognizing Palestine.

“In 1948, the Jews expelled, massacred, destroyed and raped in that year, and generally behaved like all the other colonialist movements operating in the Middle East and Africa since the beginning of the nineteenth century,” he said.

“As a result of that campaign, 500 Palestinian villages and 11 urban neighborhoods were destroyed, 700,000 Palestinians were expelled, and several thousand were massacred. It was a genocide at the time. What is happening today is not very different.”

Liberman added that Europe was mistakenly linking bilateral ties with Israel to the Palestinian issue, and that Jerusalem needed to point out that this was leading to an unprecedented rise in anti-Semitism in Europe.

Recent events in the international arena, including the Palestinian Authority’s decision to join the International Criminal Court in the Hague, he said, show that both the Oslo accords have collapsed, as has the approach in Israel advocating a preservation of the status quo.

The keywords for Israeli diplomacy in 2015, he said, need to be “Israeli initiative.”

With elections on the horizon, Liberman has recently stepped up his criticism of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu for a lack of initiative on the diplomatic track.”

Jerusalem Post Article Jan 5 2014

Mick Wallace.

Good health is a result of proper food and hygiene. How can medicaments hels up? Circumstances that can influence your choice when you are buying medications are different. Below are basic reasons about cialis vs levitra vs viagra which one is better. Surely there are also other momentous questions. Choosing the perfect treatment version for a racy disease can get really confusing considering the advantages and disadvantages of the existing treatment methodologies. When you buy remedies like Cialis you have to mind about levitra vs cialis vs viagra. The most significant thing you must look for is which works better viagra or cialis or levitra. A long list of prescription drugs can lead to erectile disfunction, including many blood stress medicines, pain remedies, and most of antidepressants. Sometimes the treatment options may switch on erectile dysfunction remedies or hormone treatments.

Dáil Diary no 60 – 22nd Dec 14

We need the Truth about US Military use of Shannon…

The recent reports by the US Senate select committee on intelligence had much of the information relating to the countries which have been complicit in the CIA torture programme, redacted, due to pressure from the Obama administration and the CIA. The Taoiseach, Department of Justice and Department of Foreign Affairs all say that there is not enough evidence to back up the claim that the US Military use of Shannon contravened International law. This is blatantly not true, and if our Government have any remote interest in establishing the truth on this issue, they should now ask the US Senate to supply any relevant sections of the full, unredacted report, in relation to Shannon. This week, I introduced a Peace and Neutrality Bill in the Dáil, which seeks to have Neutrality enshrined in our constitution. Here’s my opening statement-

“This Bill sets out to have Ireland's neutral status affirmed by adherence to the provisions of the 1907 Hague Convention (V) respecting the Rights and Duties of Neutral Powers and Persons in Case of War on Land. According to Article 2 of the Hague Convention (V): "Belligerents are forbidden to move troops or convoys of either munitions of war or supplies across the territory of a neutral Power". Thus, from March 2003, Ireland could not be described as a neutral state. When Dr. Ed Horgan took a case against the State because it was in contravention of the Hague Convention, Mr. Justice Kearns stated that international law was clear on the duties and responsibilities of a neutral state, but that since such law was not part of the Constitution or domestic law, neutrality was simply policy, and if the Government wished to end it then he, as a judge, had no role in that decision.

The Fine Gael-Labour Party Government included the following clause in the programme for Government: "We will enforce the prohibition on the use of Irish airspace, airports and related facilities for purposes not in line with the dictates of international law.” However, to date, the Government has not done so.

The fact that Irish neutrality is a Government policy rather than a constitutional necessity represents a significant risk. It was clearly demonstrated in March 2003 that the Government, under the then Taoiseach, Bertie Ahern, misled and railroaded Dáil Éireann into Irish participation in the US-led Iraq war by the simple expedient of issuing a declaration that participation in this war was not participation, thereby ending Irish neutrality while declaring falsely that Ireland was still neutral. To avoid such international and national wrongdoing in the future, it is vital that neutrality be included as an article in our Constitution by a referendum of the people, in order that only a referendum of the people can reverse that decision.

As John Lannon and Ed Horgan of Shannonwatch have pointed out, we have already abandoned neutrality by allowing US forces engaged in wars throughout the world to use Shannon Airport on a scale that was never permitted or envisaged prior to 2001. Since then, Ireland has provided direct support for unilateral military intervention by the US and its NATO allies, most notably in Iraq and Afghanistan. This support has included facilitating the transit of 2.5 million armed troops plus additional military aircraft through Shannon Airport. It has also included the deployment of members of the Defence Forces with the NATO-led international security assistance force in Afghanistan. Therefore, we need to re-establish Irish neutrality first and then amend the Constitution to ensure it is not undermined or breached again.

The weight of diplomatic efforts of a neutral Ireland could be far greater than those of a non-neutral Ireland. In the latter case, supporting NATO, which is where we will eventually end up if we continue to dilute our neutrality, will mean that our foreign policy is effectively dictated by external, more powerful states. The alignment of Ireland with other states that are engaged in war presents a significant security threat to the people. Shannon Airport is now associated with the illegal US invasions and occupations in Iraq and Afghanistan as well as military interventions in other parts of the world. This puts the airport at risk, and the only way to fully and clearly address that risk is to affirm Ireland's neutral and non-aligned status.

The Taoiseach has repeatedly defended the US landings in Shannon and indicated his trust in US assurances to a series of Governments to the effect that the planes were not being used in any way that violated Ireland's neutrality laws. The recent report into the CIA torture programme has unequivocally shown that these US assurances are worthless and that we would be foolish to continue to trust them. In the interests of State security, will the Government see the necessity of either stopping the US landings at Shannon or at the least checking the contents of every plane? We are already complicit in the illegal torture of countless prisoners, the majority of whom have been held in gulag-like conditions without trial for up to 13 years.

 In 2007 the Irish Human Rights Commission conducted an extensive review of the matter and concluded that the State was not complying with its human rights obligations to prevent torture or inhuman or degrading treatment and that its reliance on the assurances of the US Governments was not good enough. In June 2011, the UN Committee Against Torture said it was concerned at the various reports of Ireland's alleged co-operation in a rendition programme, as part of which rendition flights used the State's parties, airports and airspace. The committee said it was also concerned about the inadequate response by the State in investigating these allegations.

Most of the information in the US Senate report relating to the different countries involved in the CIA torture programme was redacted under pressure from the Obama Administration and the CIA. If we care to get to the truth of the reported US military use of Shannon Airport for extraordinary rendition, we should ask the United States Senate Select Committee on Intelligence to supply the relevant sections of the full unredacted report as soon as possible.”

Mick Wallace.

Good soundness is a result of proper supply and hygiene. How can medicaments hels up? Circumstances that can influence your choice when you are buying medications are varied. Below are basic reasons about cialis vs levitra vs viagra which one is better. Surely there are also other momentous questions. Choosing the unimprovable treatment option for a racy disease can get really confusing considering the advantages and disadvantages of the existing treatment methodologies. When you buy remedies like Cialis you have to mind about levitra vs cialis vs viagra. The most significant thing you must look for is which works better viagra or cialis or levitra. A long list of prescription drugs can lead to erectile dysfunction, including many blood stress medicines, pain remedies, and most of antidepressants. Sometimes the treatment options may include erectile dysfunction remedies or hormone treatments.

Dáil Diary no 59- 20th Dec 14

Lack of Transparency in Greyhound Industry...

This week, I got an opportunity to question the Ministry of Agriculture regarding some of the problems facing the Greyhound industry. Regulation has generally been poor, particularly in the area of drug testing - failure to make public the results of all doping tests, positive or negative, inordinate delays from the testing centre in Limerick, and the failure to deal strongly with the dogs and trainers found guilty. The Minister for State, Deputy Tom Hayes, refused to answer two of my questions – 1. Why was a conflict of interest tolerated, whereby the Chairman of the Control Board had dogs in training with someone who has been found guilty of doping Greyhounds? 2. Are Greyhounds tested for the new drug, stanozolol, in Ireland? The Minister ignored my questions. I wonder why? Here’s my Dáil contribution and Minister’s response-

Mick Wallace: "As the Minister of State is aware there are many people in Ireland who are very passionate about working with greyhounds in different facets but we have a serious problem with greyhound racing in Ireland. As the Indecon report stated the IGB was unfit for purpose. I am aware some changes have been made recently and some new people have been put in place to deal with the drug problem which is haunting the sport. Unless we get seriously improved regulation it will be hard to restore the reputation of greyhound racing.

Deputy Tom Hayes: The control, administration and regulation of greyhound racing, are the responsibility of Bord na gCon under the Greyhound Industry Acts 1958 and 1993. Two statutory committees of Bord na gCon, namely the Control Committee and the Control Appeals Committee are central to the regulatory process. These committees operate independently of Bord na gCon. The Control Committee and the Control Appeals Committee of Bord na gCon were established under the Greyhound Industry (Control Committee and Control Appeal Committee) Regulations 2007 (SI 301 of 2007).

Under that legislation, full details of any laboratory findings can only be published at the conclusion of proceedings by the Control Committee and the Control Appeals Committee. 

Article 8(6) of Greyhound Industry (Control Committee and Control Appeals Committee) Regulations 2007 (SI 301 of 2007) provides that the Control Committee shall publish its findings in all decisions in a manner it deems fit, and that such publication may be delayed subject to appeal procedures. The majority of samples obtained at licensed stadia are tested for prohibited substances in the National Greyhound Laboratory at Bord na gCon headquarters in Limerick and some samples are tested in an appropriate laboratory the UK. 

When a sample returns a positive result , owners-trainers are afforded due process including a hearing at the Control Committee and an appeal to the Control Appeal Committee. This can lead to a significant time lag from the initial notification of the positive sample to subsequent publication of the results of the positive samples. Consequently, the number of cases published in a particular year can span more than one calendar year.

Bord na gCon has confirmed to me that it is currently involved in a public consultation process with stakeholders with a view to putting in place legislation which will enable the publication of details of all adverse findings after positive results have been returned by the laboratory and prior to consideration of such cases by the Control Committee. It is envisaged that the information to be published will include the identity of the greyhounds involved and the owners and trainers.

I am informed that Bord na gCon has recently, in a move towards greater transparency, confirmed a finding of positive results after the analytical phase and prior to the hearing at the Control Committee. The complete details in relation to the owners and the greyhounds will be available when the Control Committee, and the Appeals Committee if appropriate, has concluded its deliberations in relation to findings which are upheld.

Bord na gCon has recently appointed a Director of Racing, Governance and Compliance. Furthermore, I have appointed a person to the board who has particular expertise in veterinary and related matters.

We are also changing the legislation. Officials from my Department are currently working on greyhound legislation to identify any legislative changes that need to be updated. That will be brought before the House as soon as we possibly can.

Mick Wallace: I thank the Minister of State. Given the way the matter is being dealt with, I am glad to hear a review is about to take place because stakeholders, small owners, who are concerned about how things have gone on up to now have approached me. There is little doubt that there have been people involved in controlling how things are regulated in the greyhound industry who should not be involved in it. There are some serious conflict of interests, where the chairman of the control board has dogs in training with a guy who has been found to be guilty of doping dogs. How in God's name can this be allowed happen? There has to be a serious look at who has been involved. As the Minister of State is aware, in September the greyhound board in Britain made a statement warning English buyers against purchasing dogs in Ireland because they were drug ridden. How bad is this?

Deputy Tom Hayes:  We need to be very careful in terms of drawing a line and saying this industry is full of people who are breaking the law.

That is what is being said and that is the perception. I attend many tracks up and down the country and several functions and I hear this all this all the time. I want to be quite clear, the Indecon report which we published has several recommendations on regulation. We will implement them. There is no room in this industry for anybody who is breaking the law. We are quite clear on that and we will move as fast as we possibly can. I want to assure the Deputy and everybody in the industry that no stone will remain unturned on this issue. We will do everything possible and if anybody is involved in drugs they will be dealt with as they have no place in the industry. We want a clean sport. This industry is subsidised by taxpayers in a major way. As the Minister responsible I sent out a clear signal that we want this area regulated 100%.

Deputy Mick Wallace:  I am not saying all dogs in Ireland are drugged, they are not. In actual fact, the view on the street is that it is the bigger trainers and owners who are the most guilty in this area and not the small guys.

Why have we allowed a system to prevail where it takes three weeks to get a result back from Limerick whereas in Britain results can be back in 48 hours? Surely that does not make for great transparency. The fines have been larger in Britain. The suspensions have been much clearer and enforced to a greater extent. We have been very lax in how we have done things here. The small trainers feel that the playing field is not level.

The big boys are getting away with murder and being shown favouritism at the expense of the industry in general and the small guy. Does the Minister of State know if there are tests for stanozolol, a new drug on the market, in greyhounds?

Deputy Tom Hayes:  If I go to a greyhound track, the first person I meet will tell me one thing about it, while someone else further on will tell me the opposite and not to listen to others. That is the view on the street, but the facts are totally different. A full assessment of the greyhound board was carried out by Indecon which contained 27 recommendations, a large number of which related to testing and doping, all of which are being dealt with, even though we only received them several months ago. A new regulatory committee will be put in place and will be appointed by me. It will be independent of Bord na gCon, as well as small and big trainers. We want a level playing field for everyone involved.

Mick Wallace

Good heartiness is a result of proper nutrition and hygiene. How can medicaments hels up? Circumstances that can influence your choice when you are buying medications are various. Below are basic reasons about cialis vs levitra vs viagra which one is better. Surely there are also other momentous questions. Choosing the unimprovable treatment variation for a racy disease can get really confusing considering the advantages and disadvantages of the existing treatment methodologies. When you buy remedies like Cialis you have to remember about levitra vs cialis vs viagra. The most significant thing you must look for is which works better viagra or cialis or levitra. A long list of prescription drugs can lead to erectile dysfunction, including many blood stress medicines, pain remedies, and most of antidepressants. Sometimes the treatment options may switch on erectile dysfunction remedies or hormone treatments.

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